April 29 – 68 Leto

Asteroid 68 Leto was discovered by Robert Luther on April 29th 1861.  It’s a fairly big main belt asteroid (about 125km diameter) with an absolute magnitude of 6.78, and an apparent magnitude from down here of 9.56 when at its brightest.

Leto was the daughter of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe, and mother (by Zeus, of course) of Apollo and Artemis.  She was thought to have been born on the island of Kos.  Apart from her role in bearing two important gods, Leto is hardly heard about in Greek writing and seems to have been content to remain in the Olympian background.  This fits in with her being generally portrayed as a demure woman, modestly lifting her veil.  The word letho means “to move unseen”, which may explain it.  Perhaps she’s hiding from Hera, Zeus’ wife.

Latona and the Lycian Peasants, by Jan Brueghel the Elder (about 1605).

Latona and the Lycian Peasants, by Jan Brueghel the Elder (about 1605).

The oil painting above, by Jan Brueghel the Elder, shows another incident from Leto’s life, also concerning Hera.  In a foul mood at discovering that Leto was to bear children to Zeus, Hera cursed her to be shunned everywhere she went.  In the painting, she is attempting to drink from a pond in Lycia (southern Turkey), but is being prevented from so doing by the locals, who are stirring up the mud from the bottom of the pond.  She responded by turning them into frogs.


Also today, it now transpires that in 1801 main belt asteroid 69 Hesperia was discovered by Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli from Milan.  Previously the discovery date had been thought to be April 26, but in an editorial notice of August 29th 2015 the Minor Planet Center announced that an examination of the literature of the time of the discovery shows that the date should in fact be pushed back three days.

Being a patriotic kinda guy, Schiaparelli had named his new discovery in honour of his home country, but for some reason used the Greek name for Italy rather than the Latin (or Italian) one.  The M-type Hesperia is a fairly chunky size, and would be about 130 km in diameter, if it were a sphere (which it isn’t).  I use the word “diameter” a lot in this blog to describe asteroids, but it just means “wide in no particular direction”.

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