March 28 – 2 Pallas

Asteroid 2 Pallas was discovered on March 28th, 1802, by Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers, physician by day, astronomer by night, and the man after whom the Olbers Paradox (the one about why the sky is dark if the universe is infinite) is named.  He discovered Pallas while trying to locate Ceres, which had been discovered by Giuseppe Piazzi the previous year.

Pallas (from the Hubble Space Telescope). Image: NSAS

Pallas (from the Hubble Space Telescope). Image: NASA

Pallas is at the larger end of the minor planet scale,  being about 550 km wide on average (it isn’t round). It is a B-type body, one of the less common asteroid types. B’s are similar to the much more populous C-types, but with a greater albedo, and different a absorption lines in their spectra.

Statue of Pallas Athene above the Austrian Parliament Building in Vienna (image credit: Max Novara)

Statue of Pallas Athene above the Austrian Parliament Building in Vienna (image credit: Max Novara)

Pallas is named after the Greek goddess Athena (she was often referred to as Pallas Athena/Athene), goddess of wisdom, daughter of Zeus and Metis, owner of the Aegis, and friend of owls. Her Roman equivalent was Minerva.


On March 28, 1900, asteroid 454 Mathesis was discovered from Heidelberg by Friedrich Karl Arnold Schwassmann. Mathesis is a main belt asteroid of about 81.6 km diameter, having, apparently, a rather pleasing year of 1555.5 days, and an equally pleasing albedo of 0.0555. I wonder if that’s why it was named after mathematics?

Schwassmann was discoverer of 22 asteroids, but this was his first without the assistance of the even more prolific discoverer, Max Wolf .


 2009  –  Start of ISS expedition 19.


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